Tuesday, 4 January 2011

The Road to Serfdom



Presuming that book that the Tories banged on about in the '80s was a 'how to' guide, then you'd have to say they've chosen the blueprint well.

-Millions of skilled jobs are going to go. If they're lucky the people who will be fired might get to do unskilled labour, stacking shelves in Tescos or Sainsbury's.
-Plans are afoot to privatise 100% of England's forests to keep the dirty poor people out
-Whilst Squire Cameron hates big government (meaning paying people to do skilled labour which the free market cannot provide and getting him to hand over small change to look after poor people) this isn't to say he's too fussy about anti-terrorism officers stopping his subjects from getting uppity.
-VAT is to rise whilst our ultra-rich plutocrats can continue to exploit tax loopholes.
-200,000 low income Brits are set to be expelled from the nation's capital.

Still, I guess that economic freedom and political freedom goes together, and the trickle down effect keeps income inequality from getting too bad.

2 comments:

  1. Gregor wrote:

    “Whilst Squire Cameron hates big government (meaning paying people to do skilled labour which the free market cannot provide and getting him to hand over small change to look after poor people) this isn't to say he's too fussy about anti-terrorism officers stopping his subjects from getting uppity.”

    Great point. Right-wingers seem to hate big government when it attempts to help people, but they love big government when it involves draconian domestic security and warfare abroad. I think this says a lot about the mentality of many on the Right. I find it interesting that many Tea Partiers think universal health care is fascism but the extrajudicial murder of Julian Assange by the government would have been great.

    Even the libertarians are not immune. The relatively small governments of the nineteenth century that libertarians are so fond of were often quite willing to shoot or club workers or peasants or foreigners, but it took a lot of pressure to get them to start enacting social reforms that actually benefited regular people.

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  2. @John
    Thanks for your comment. Indeed, the 19th-early 20th Century government of Austro-Hungary (where Hayek's ancestors were nobles and which he idealised) massacred entire families of Romanians, Serbs and Moldovans.

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