Saturday, 19 March 2011

Guardian Quiz



















-Too quiet for whom?

-Too awkward for whom?

-Too left-wing for whom?

Apart from the increasingly irrelevant print media?

Liberalism, Nationalism and Rationalism
















Above is a photo of a fossil I found called 'Osteolepis'. It's a rhipidistia from roughly 400 million years ago; the branch of fish that it belonged to are the ancestors of most land vertebrates from snakes to eagles to humans.

An amazing thought which for me is full of awe, which for me is one of the wonders of science and why I feel faith and science go hand in hand. I feel considerably greater awe at this than the thought of visiting a creationist museum where rubber cavemen in pigskin nappies wander around at the feet of plastic dinosaurs.

In fact the creationist museum would only be entertaining compared to some outlets of the modern atheist movement like this website which is so profoundly vulgar and self-congratulating. In its own words 'it's commentary from a secular, rationalist, skeptical, somewhat lefty-liberal, sort of perspective'

Weirdly enough I think it is more as a Scot than as a Christian that I find these unqualified congratulatory adjectives so alien. I don't know what sort of patter you get from the author of 'the pod delusion' but I'm betting that irony isn't really their forte.

Which is probably why they invite Johann Hari to tell them how wonderful and moral they are and why modern Britain is so wonderful and moral. Being rational and sceptical he's probably come armed with reams of facts and figures to support this claim, hasn't he? Well, no. Apparently gays and women are better of in an atheistic nation (like the USSR or Cuba?).

Whether or not these are the sole criteria for morality, Hari provides as much objective evidence as to their correlation with noisy atheism as he does for any of its other 'achievements': zilch.
And I don't remember being given a questionnaire as to whether I believe in God and whether my faith makes me want to oppress women or gays.

But his idea of womenkind's exalted place in secular Blighty isn't really a consistent theme in his writing, as in this article he proudly linked to recently.

Whilst the theme is hero worship of men who are brutal to women I have to say I emphatically don't worship William Jefferson Clinton who bombed my Orthodox cousins in Serbia. But I would hesitate to call him a rapist given his lack of trial by jury, sound conviction and all (and maybe best not to bring Christopher Hitchens in as star witness when criticising fawning articles about Norman Mailer).

Yet when you read on you get the impression that trial by jury isn't something that matters much to secular atheist fanaticism:

'Why do we so carefully turn a blind eye to the bruised bodies of so many abused women? This selective blindness isn't confined to news coverage; it informs our political life. Imagine if in Britain today, hundreds of thousands of men were being pinned down – in hotels, living rooms, and back alleys – and anally raped by their "friends" or acquaintances, and virtually no one was ever punished for it. It would be one of the biggest issues in British politics. Yet it really does happen to women – so it is a third-tier issue, wheeled out once a decade.'

Uhm, no sane human being denies that rape is a horrific crime. It's just that the law of the land tends to go about these things on a case by case sort of a way: not a quota.

Yet, I increasingly feel that in future this could well change. I feel sympathetic to any primary research on why there is a dissonance between convicted and alleged rape and welcome any rational constructive recommendations (which is not the same thing as increasing conviction anymore than it would be to decrease conviction), but I do feel worried by the thought that anti-male bigotry should be a blinding force for irrational legal reform.

More and more I feel that England is going down a divergent path: that liberalism is growing increasingly intolerant and irrational as its ideals divert from reality. There are certainly aspects of Scots nationalism that I find embarrassing (for readers' benefit I don't have a kilt, Glengarry, Corries collection or Claymore). However, I increasingly think if there is a political division then this will be due more to the irrational energy of mainstream English liberalism than atavistic nationalism on either side of the border.

Tuesday, 15 March 2011

The Soluble Problem

















Can't say I much like the tone of Brian (not the Queen guitarist) True-May. But I actually suspect that he might, just, possibly be justified in his view (if not the implicit wish) that rural Blighty isn't actually much of a melting pot... purely based on the fact I can't name any non-white folks or even East European immigrants in any of the towns I've lived in.

So here's a scientific solution to accurately reflect how multicultural rural Britain is. Howsabout 'Midsomer Murders' has to have an ethnic minority character for every ethnic minority participant on 'Bargain Hunt'?

Yes? Yes!